The WMG Newsletter

Get advanced notice of new releases, bonus content, and so much more.

About WMG Publishing

Founded in 2010, WMG Publishing, Inc. is located in Lincoln City, OR. The company publishes more than 700 fiction and nonfiction titles in trade paperback, ebook and audiobook formats. In 2013, the company launched Fiction River: An Original Anthology Magazine, which publishes six volumes a year containing short fiction from New York Times bestsellers to debut authors. In 2018, the company relaunched Pulphouse Fiction Magazine, a quarterly publication containing short fiction from New York Times bestsellers to debut authors. WMG Publishing, Inc. is also an industry leader in the cutting edge of independent publishing, offering online lectures and workshops as well as in-person workshops in Las Vegas. For more information about WMG learning opportunities, go to www.wmgworkshops.comFor more information about the company, go to www.wmgpublishinginc.com or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

The Latest News

Publisher’s Note: Pulphouse Subscription Drive Launches on Kickstarter!


Two years ago, WMG Publishing decide to bring back a publication dormant for more than twenty years: The three-time Hugo Award-nominated Pulphouse Fiction Magazine.  And now, it’s time for our first subscription drive after two years of publishing success with the magazine. And like all our subscription drives, we’re doing this one on Kickstarter. But more about that in a minute.

First, a bit about the role Pulphouse Fiction Magazine plays in our product offerings.

Pulphouse adds a different flavor to our magazine line.

Fiction River is purely original short fiction and varies in tone by the editor of each volume, but its voice is influenced by the collaborative oversight of series editors Kristine Kathryn Rusch and Dean Wesley Smith.

Fiction River Presents is the reprint line for Fiction River for which I act as series editor, and is sourced primarily from Fiction River volumes (with an occasional grab from the WMG inventory). This past year has also seen volumes edited by Kris and by associate publisher Gwyneth Gibby.

And although other people have a hand in the creation of Pulphouse Fiction Magazine (including managing editor Josh Frase and Kris as executive editor), Pulphouse always has been and always will be Dean’s brainchild.

Dean edits Pulphouse Fiction Magazine for WMG, just like he did two decades ago for Pulphouse. It always has been about pure attitude. The cutting edge of modern fiction. If you’ve read the original version or the modern reincarnation of the magazine, you’ll understand what I’m talking about. If you haven’t, you’re in for a ride.

Here’s an excerpt of what Dean has to say about the magazine from the Kickstarter page:

In our first two years of this new incarnation, we hit our quarterly schedule on time and with larger issues than planned. We also put out three Pulphouse books as we had promised in our first Kickstarter drive. 


So eight issues and three books. A total success in our first two years.


Shocking! Amazing! And a great deal of fun! 


But we’re not done. Not by a long ways. Now we need your help going forward. We hope you will not only renew your subscription, but take us up on some of the wonderful rewards and add-ons we have available. Everything helps us keep the high-quality fiction going for the next two years.


And we will have some really spectacular new books and stretch goals if we can get to them.


Pulphouse Fiction Magazine is back, growing and stronger than ever. And with your help, we’ll keep growing for years to come.

Click here to go straight to the Kickstarter campaign.

If you supported the original Kickstarter we did to relaunch the magazine (thank you!!!), your subscription likely needs to be renewed, and we have all sorts of awesome rewards to choose from. If you missed that one, now is a great time to join us for this wild ride.

If you want to take a look at what we’ve been up to the past two years, click here. You’ll also find buy links for all of the past volumes if you want to catch up on what you’ve missed.

Thank to you all our current and future Pulphouse supporters. We couldn’t do this without you!

Allyson Longueira is publisher of WMG Publishing. She is an award-winning writer, editor and designer, working mother, and brain tumor survivor.

Publisher’s Note: Five New Releases and a Kickstarter!


We had a wonderful visit with our own Dean Wesley Smith last week as we did some business strategizing and also planning for the next Pulphouse Fiction Magazine Kickstarter, which launches this week. Last week also saw the publication of five new books: three that you’ve heard about and two new ones of the Pulphouse variety.

First up, the ones you knew were coming: Killing the Angel of Death by Kristine Kathryn Rusch, Luck Be Ladies: A Poker Boy Collection by Dean Wesley Smith, and Fiction River Presents: Sorcery & Steam, edited by Gwyneth Gibby, are all available in ebook from your favorite retailer. The paperback volumes will be available soon. Click on each title above for more details and purchase information.

And now, more on Pulphouse. It was great timing to have Dean here for such a busy Pulphouse week, since he is, of course, the editor and driving force behind that magazine. If you’ve ever met Dean, you know that his personality very much reflects the tone of Pulphouse. His visits are always a little off-the-wall but a whole lot of fun.

One of the books released last week was the summer issue of Pulphouse (#7 if you’re counting). The second is the first all-original book in the Pulphouse line, called Snot-Nosed Aliens. Here are the details on each of those:

Pulphouse Fiction Magazine: Issue #7

A three-time Hugo Award nominated magazine, this issue of Pulphouse Fiction Magazine offers up eighteen fantastic stories by some of the best writers working in modern short fiction. No genre limitations, no topic limitations, just great stories. Attitude, feel, and high-quality fiction equals Pulphouse.

Table of Contents:
“Small Discrete Intervals from a Sample Size of One” by J. Steven York
“Daisy’s Heart” by Robert J. McCarter
“Dogmatic Computing” by Kent Patterson
“Suicide by UFO” by Jerry Oltion
“Another Door” by Annie Reed
“Introducing Alligators” by Preston Dennett
“The Mouse is Watching” by S. Andrew Swann
“Dreams of Memories Never Lived” by Rob Vagle
“A Pathetic Excuse for a Dragon” by David H. Hendrickson
“Moulin Rouge” by Jason A. Adams
“Maddie Sue’s Locket” by C.A. Rowland
“Rough Draft” by Kevin J. Anderson (written with Rebecca Moesta)
“A Good Shooting” by O’Neil De Noux
“Good Fences Make Good Neighbors” by Teri J. Babcock
“Lost Book” by Ryan M. Williams
“Acceptable Losses” by Dayle A. Dermatis
“A Choose Your Own Fangle Adventure” by Robert Jeschonek
“Say Hello to my Little Friend” by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
“Minions at Work: White Space” by J. Steven York

Snot-Nosed Aliens: Stories from Pulphouse Fiction Magazine

When you ask a bunch of professional writers to send in stories to a Pulphouse Fiction Magazine anthology called Snot-Nosed Aliens, you get a bunch of really, really strange stories. Perfect.

Known for high-quality fiction and off-the-wall stories, Pulphouse Fiction Magazine’s first fully original anthology delivers both. Head-shaking laughter, biting themes, and more out-of-this-world aliens than should be allowed.

Thirteen professional writers. Thirteen wonderful stories. An original anthology impossible to put down.

Table of Contents:
“The Problematic Navigation of the Vessel Clayton Booker” by J. Steven York
“Blue-Eyed Bombshell” by Annie Reed
“Pepper Pretorious Saves the Day” by Dayle A. Dermatis
“Hero of Fire Life” by Michael Warren Lucas
“Bushtits Gone Wild” by Stephanie Writt
“Dog People” by Robert J. McCarter
“Magnitude and Insignificance” by Rob Vagle
“Let the Families Be Joined” by Joe Cron
“Knock Knock Power” by Johanna Rothman
“Ilene’s Box” by Alexandra Brandt
“The Goddess Particle” by Daemon Crowe
“Two-Minute Drill” by David H. Hendrickson
“Power Chords” by Brigid Collins

If you haven’t already received these volumes (as a subscriber), they are a wonderful escape for the waning days of summer.

And if you want to subscribe to Pulphouse Fiction Magazine (or renew your subscription), there’s never been a better time! Our biennial subscription drive on Kickstarter launches on Wednesday and features the best prices you can find on not only subscriptions (to Pulphouse, Fiction River, and Smith’s Monthly), but also WMG workshops and some other special projects. Click here once it’s live to read all about it!

So many books to read! Thank goodness we still have some summer left.

Allyson Longueira is publisher of WMG Publishing. She is an award-winning writer, editor and designer, working mother, and brain tumor survivor.

Publisher’s Note: Bundled up for August


The fog has arrived on the Oregon Coast, so it’s time to break out the jacket again in case I need to bundle up a bit for my daily walking endeavors.

And that has me thinking about bundles. Good thing, too, because we have only a couple of days left on the Sorcery & Steam Storybundle, while a new Storybundle called Racing the Clock launches late Tuesday/early Wednesday (depending on where you are in the world).

What a thrilling addition to our August lineup.

As you might recall from my July 22 Publisher’s Note, the Sorcery & Steam Storybundle includes three new books exclusive to this bundle—Killing the Angel of Death by Kristine Kathryn Rusch, Luck Be Ladies: A Poker Boy Collection by Dean Wesley Smith, and Fiction River Presents: Sorcery & Steam, edited by Gwyneth Gibby—as well as seven other fantastic ebooks for the low price of just $15. Click here for more information or to buy the bundle.

I’ll talk about the wide release of those books in next week’s Publisher’s Note if you’re waiting for that information.

If you’re looking for a thrilling assemblage of fast-paced fiction, the Racing the Clock bundle might be just your speed. That bundle includes three previously published WMG titles: Fiction River Presents: Racing the Clock, edited by me; Death Takes a Diamond: A Mary Jo Assassin Novel by Dean Wesley Smith; and The Tower by Kristine Kathryn Rusch.

Here are the synopses for each book:

Fiction River Presents: Racing the Clock

The latest volume of Fiction River Presents makes the heart race. From one woman’s desperate attempts to escape her kidnappers to another woman’s attempts to escape a doomed space station, this volume takes off at a pulse-pounding pace and refuses to let go until the very end. Including a short story from Kristine Kathryn Rusch’s bestselling Retrieval Artist sf thriller series, this volume proves why Adventures Fantastic says the Fiction River series “is one of the best and most exciting publications in the field today.”

Includes:
“The Chair by” JC Andrijeski
“Tower One” by Thomas K. Carpenter
“The Good Brother” by Brendan DuBois
“The Elevator in the Cornfield” by Scott William Carter
“The Red-Stained Wishing Tree” by Eric Stocklassa
“The Scent of Amber and Vanilla” by Dayle A. Dermatis
“Play the Man” by Dan C. Duval
“Eyes on My Cards” by Dean Wesley Smith
“H-Hour” by Steven Mohan, Jr.
“Sole Survivor” by Kristine Kathryn Rusch

Death Takes a Diamond

When a contract comes in on another assassin, Mary Jo must discover why. Assassins don’t kill assassins.

With four ancient-order assassins working together, anything becomes possible.

Sex, murder, and diamonds. And pretty much in that order.

Only Mary Jo Assassin can deliver all three with a smile and a vodka orange juice drink in her hand.

The Tower

So many mysteries in the past. So many opportunities as well. As Portals, Inc. uses historians to test its time travel devices, historians use Portals to test their theories.

Neyla believes the 17th century discovery of the dead Princes near the Bloody Tower will tell her who murdered the boys centuries before.

Thomas Ayliffe believes he can pull off the crime of the century—any century.

All three agendas collide in a story about crimes and criminals, past, present, and future.

The Racing the Clock Storybundle can be found here once it’s live.

For more information on Fiction River Presents subscriptions, click here.

So, race on over to Storybundle and see what fabulous deals await!

Allyson Longueira is publisher of WMG Publishing. She is an award-winning writer, editor and designer, working mother, and brain tumor survivor.

Publisher’s Note: Publishing Challenges and Miracles


I’m going to let you in on a little publishing secret: Our best laid publishing plans sometimes get thrown a curveball. This most often happens with established series. Series branding is a very important aspect of publishing. The design (cover and interior), the way the books are titled, the way the books are numbered…all of this is essential information that must be as consistent and informative as humanly possible so that the reader (newfound or longtime fan) knows that each book is part of that series.

But what happens when a brilliant author tends to write out of order? Well, she’s brilliant, so you accommodate, but sometimes you must work miracles to do so.

The author I’m talking about is the amazing Kristine Kathryn Rusch. If you’ve followed me (or her) for years, you’ll know that the Retrieval Artist series encountered such an event. After Kris wrote Anniversary Day and Blowback (the eighth and ninth books in that series), she realized that they were not standalone novels but rather books one and two of what would turn out to be an eight-book story arc we named the Anniversary Day Saga. This meant we’d have to republish the first two books with the saga information (and some other additions). We did that in late 2014. The rest of the saga was published in 2015. You can find all of those books here.

Republishing those books in 2014 wasn’t a huge deal at the time, although we were locked into our original title and subtitle information because that’s tied to the ISBN, which is tied to your sales rankings and algorithm data. It’s a big deal to publish a book under a new ISBN. Plus, the old book never disappears in this new world because of third-party resellers, so it can be confusing for readers. We don’t like to confuse readers. Ever.

But I encountered a huge problem with that 2014 decision last week, when I went to drop the price of the paperbacks on Amazon from $18.99 to $14.99. I could successfully drop them on all of the titles except one: Blowback. For some reason that one book wouldn’t accept the update because of the series information from first publication and it wanted me to add a number 9 (as in Retrieval Artist series, book 9) to the cover and interior. No other book in the entire series has that. The Book Two of the Anniversary Day Saga was confusing the bots. Clearly, they thought, it was book two, not book nine. Sigh. After much investigation and discussion of our options, I managed to outwit the bots and get the price lowered. It’s not ideal, but it’ll do for now.

With an inventory as large as ours (700+ titles), managing our books is a full-time job that we don’t yet have the staff for. We will, but not yet. For now, it falls to me to get creative. Fortunately, I can be very creative.

This skill came in handy again recently when we were faced with publishing the newest Diving Series novel—a 263,000-word behemoth called The Renegat. It’s a fantastic book, worth every word, but the challenge came in figuring out how to fit that many words into the KDP publishing restrictions on page count so that we could publish the book direct to the Amazon universe. KDP has a strict 776-page limit.

When we ran the book using our established interior design parameters for the Diving Series paperback novels, it came in at 1,000 pages.

Originally, when faced with that information, we resigned ourselves to only using Ingram-Spark, which allows for more pages. I was still out on medical leave at the time, and we couldn’t figure out a way to cut 225 pages from the book without cutting content.

But once I returned (and, more importantly, my brain power returned), I decided to give it a go. I was an award-winning designer long before I became a publisher, so I was the best suited to such a task. But as publisher, I’m also the most expensive employee we have, so that was a call I had to make. And thanks to an amazingly successful Kickstarter for the Diving Series, we could afford me doing a redesign. So, I did.

A lot of this is very technical design stuff, but the short of it is, I redid everything: margins, fonts, type size, tracking, leading…. And I individually adjusted at least a quarter of the paragraphs in the book to gain space and reduce page count. This is not something you can do with the fancy new publishing software we happily use for other projects. And I still had to keep the feel of the Diving Series paperbacks, because the branding is so important. I leaned on all my professional design experience to pull off a miracle.

And pull it off I did. The new proof of The Renegat is exactly 776 pages (the max KDP limit). I’ll be honest, I was pretty stressed there toward the end that I would have to go back to the beginning and shave more, but it just fit.

(Brain surgery, you are so four months ago!)

This redesign has caused a slight delay in our Kickstarter reward fulfillment of the paperbacks, for which you have my humble apologies, but we’ll get things to you as soon as possible. And in the end, you’ll thank me, I think. The new book has a 2-inch spine (well, 1.94 inches, technically) and weighs 2.5 pounds. I’ve shared a photo of my 9-year-old daughter reading it. She thought it was pretty awesome. But we’re all glad it wasn’t any bigger!

The Renegat will be released Sept. 17, but you can preorder it in ebook here. And if you supported the Kickstarter, you should already have received an electronic copy. If you haven’t, please let us know here.

And now, I have a very large proof that I can’t wait to review.

Allyson Longueira is publisher of WMG Publishing. She is an award-winning writer, editor and designer, working mother, and brain tumor survivor.

Publisher’s Note: Short Reads for a Busy Week


If your week is shaping up to be as hectic as mine have been lately, I’ve got some short fiction to tell you about. Two new short stories by Kristine Kathryn Rusch, in fact.

The first is called “The Wedding Ring.” I find Vegas wedding stories fascinating, in part, because I’ve been married in Vegas more than once but always as a planned event (and never with Elvis officiating). I guess I just like the simplicity of a Vegas wedding. Big fuss and planning never appealed to me. And my last wedding—the only one I wore an honest-to-goodness wedding dress for because I finally knew this was the one—was the only one where we invited guests to attend. It was a wonderfully romantic ceremony made even better by the addition of our daughter to the ceremony.

But “The Wedding Ring” is not a romance. Not even close.

Here’s the synopsis:

When Serena meets Dylan in a casino hallway, she embraces the fairy tale. Whirlwind romance, Vegas wedding, all of it.

But when the fairy tale ends abruptly, she vows to find out why. And what she discovers proves more shocking than winning big in Vegas.

Named one of the best short mysteries of the year for 2018 by SeuthSayers.

You can buy “The Wedding Ring” here.

The second story is available for free this week only on Kris’ website as her latest Free Fiction offering. It’s called “Sales. Force.” and while it, too, deals with love (lost love, love potions), it’s also not even close to a romance. Here’s the synopsis:

Kaylee uses her magic to help her boss, Nia, keep the balance when Nia needs someone with Kaylee’s particular talents. But when Kaylee returns to work shortly after her fiancé dies, the assignment Nia proposes leaves Kaylee puzzled.

Nia wants Kaylee to investigate a new love potion. Kaylee wants to use her magical strength to get over her grief.

This assignment might help Kaylee move on in ways she never expected.

Click here to read “Sales. Force.” on Kris’ website or here to buy it to read whenever you want on your own device.

So, if you want a short respite from the sunny summer weather, and delightfully dark and twisty tales, give one or both of these stories a try.

Allyson Longueira is publisher of WMG Publishing. She is an award-winning writer, editor and designer, working mother, and brain tumor survivor.

Publisher’s Note: One Steamy Summer


We’re having a particularly humid summer here on the Oregon Coast. In an average year, July is our driest month, at about 63 percent humidity. We spent much of July this year at more than 90 percent humidity. We don’t normally hit that even in the winter. Our max average is just above 80 percent humidity.

And although our temperatures have been about average (in the 60s), that humidity still takes a toll. (I know, I know, those of you living in places like the Southeast, Midwest, and other regions or countries with hot, humid climates just rolled your eyes, but hear me out.) We’re not used to this here on the Oregon Coast. I’m used to having to bundle up in layers to walk to work because of the cooler temperatures and strong winds, but when you have to wear a jacket and it’s still warmish and humid: you sweat when you move. And now that I’m on that walking streak, that means even though I can now drive, I often don’t. I still prefer to walk as many places as I can…while I can. If I wanted to get all sweaty just because I stepped outside, I’d live in the Southeast near my family.

I know I shouldn’t complain. We’re far better off here than a lot of you are in other areas of the Northern Hemisphere right now, weather-wise. So, I’ll stop whining about it.

Besides, I have a much more interesting kind of steam-related topic to talk about. Steampunk. And sorcery. Because this Wednesday marks the launch of our latest Storybundle, Sorcery & Steam, curated by Dean Wesley Smith. And although most of you know the drill on Storybundles already, this one is different for us.

For the first time since we’ve been doing Storybundles, the three books in this bundle are exclusive to the Storybundle. We’ll release them wide once the Storybundle ends, but until then, this bundle is the only way to get them as soon as possible. (With one exception: Fiction River Presents ebook subscribers received the new volume the same day the Storybundle launched, per their subscription terms. For more information on Fiction River Presents subscriptions, click here.)

Those books are: Killing the Angel of Death by Kristine Kathryn Rusch, Luck Be Ladies: A Poker Boy Collection by Dean Wesley Smith, and Fiction River Presents: Sorcery & Steam, edited by Gwyneth Gibby.

Here are the synopses for each book:

Killing the Angel of Death

When Roderigo and Izzy form a group to stop the Angel of Death from taking more innocent lives, they realize they need help. One by one, Roderigo recruits people who see the creatures, who know their evil magic, who suffer from the damage the angels wreak.

When Roderigo enlists the newest recruit—a war-damaged sniper—he achieves the formula for the group’s ultimate success. But he might have just doomed the group to the ultimate failure.

A gut-wrenching story about love, loss, and the powerful inevitability of grief.

Luck Be Ladies

Superhero Poker Boy works for Stan, the God of Poker. But sometimes Poker Boy and his team come to the aid of Lady Luck, the most powerful God of them all. And the boss of everything.

In these five Poker Boy stories, meet three of Lady Luck’s four daughters. In the novella, “For the Balance of a Heart,” Lady Luck asks Poker Boy to find her missing daughter, the Queen of Hearts. In “That Lost Riddle,” Poker Boy helps the Queen of Diamonds solve an ancient riddle. And in “The Rules of the Game,” Poker Boy assists Lady Luck with her warrior daughter, the Queen of Clubs.

But Poker Boy also gets to save Lady Luck in “Luck Be a Lady” and rescue Lady Luck’s one great love in “You Forgive the Night’s Scream.”

Enjoy the crazy world of Poker Boy, one of the newest and most puzzling superheroes you might ever meet.

Fiction River Presents: Sorcery & Steam

Steampunk and sorcery offer fantastic flights of imagination in this latest volume of Fiction River Presents. From the merciless march of Lovecraftian prose to the echoes of Russell Hoban’s Ridley Walker, these nine authors create convincing and compelling worlds that feel like familiar places from some past life or dream. With engaging characters often caught in agonizing situations, this spellbinding volume proves why Adventures Fantastic says the Fiction River series “is one of the best and most exciting publications in the field today.”

Includes:
“Murmuration of a Darkening Sea” by Lee Allred
“Heart” by Leslie Claire Walker
“The Whirring Dreams of Aberrant Blood” by Cindie Geddes
“The Clunkety” by Brenda Carre
“Skinwalker” by Valerie Brook
“Dead Men Walking” by Annie Reed
“The Airship Adventures of Captain Jane Fury” by Anthea Sharp
“Trouble Aboard the Flying Scotsman” by Alistair Kimble
“The Scottish Play” by Kristine Kathryn Rusch

For more information or to buy this Storybundle, click here.

I can’t think of a better distraction from the steamy weather outside than sitting someplace cool and reading great books.

Allyson Longueira is publisher of WMG Publishing. She is an award-winning writer, editor and designer, working mother, and brain tumor survivor.

Publisher’s Note: Proximity is Everything


One of the most annoying things about my brain surgery recovery is that I’m not allowed to drive. That will end at some point, but I have no idea yet when. So, for the most part, I must get where I need to go on foot.

This is a mixed blessing. The brain tumor itself had weakened my body to the point that doctors were surprised I could still walk when they finally discovered it. Now that the tumor is gone, walking is actually the best thing I can do for my recovery.

But I need to rebuild my muscles and stamina as I go, so I can only walk so far.

As a result, I need to confine my walking to a limited radius from my house so I don’t wind up accidently stranded somewhere or way overdo it getting myself home.

As I was figuring out where I could and could not go, I realized something that having ready access to a car had robbed me of: my house, which I bought 13 years ago, is in the best possible location one could ask for. Who knew?

From here, I’m within 2,000 steps of the following (and this is not an all-inclusive list):

  • My office
  • A grocery store
  • A natural foods store
  • My doctor’s office
  • My salon
  • Urgent care
  • A dentist’s office
  • The police station
  • A fire station
  • A pharmacy
  • The post office
  • City Hall
  • The local library
  • An outlet mall
  • The cultural center
  • My daughter’s karate dojo
  • Beach access
  • Lake access

Oh, and add to that a good dozen restaurants, including a coffee shop, pizza place, two Thai food places, Mexican food, high-end seafood place, a fish ‘n chips place, barbecue place, ice cream shop, two fast-food places and more.

Plus, the two nonprofit boards I’m on hold their board meetings within that same radius.

Ironically, I can also walk to the car wash, but, you know, not so useful…

I had no idea until I needed it how very close I am to just about everything.

And if I truly needed it, I’m just a block away from a bus stop.

That proximity to so many things has made what could feel like a very restrictive part of my recovery into something kinda cool.

And once I started back to working in the office, I pretty much walk everywhere. I’m on a streak now. I’ve hit at least 5,000 steps every day since June 8. And I’ll make sure I have enough rain gear so that doesn’t have to stop once the weather turns all Oregon Coast again this fall.

It’s amazing what close proximity will do for you.

But sometimes, proximity (albeit of a different variety) is not your friend. I discovered that recently, too, when we were alerted to a problem with our newest release’s books cover.

We mostly use stock art for our book covers. We’re not alone. The big trads do this a lot, too. But sometimes you wind up in a situation where another cover looks far too similar to your own. This happened with Hidden Charm. A reader alerted us to this fact. I had conducted a search prior to using that particular art, but Amazon shows different things to different people, so the cover at issue did not come up for me at that time. This is not unusual.

Normally, I wouldn’t stress out about another cover having the same art. This is a known quantity when it comes to using stock art for cover design. But in this case, the topic of the book (also an alternative take on the Rapunzel fairy tale) was too close for comfort. The other author released her book first, so we redid ours. It’s more about common courtesy than anything else, frankly.

So, here’s the redesigned cover of Hidden Charm. I used the same model but she’s in a different pose. This was important because we’d already launched the book, and done a lot of sales and marketing, and we didn’t want to confuse the readers who had already bought the book. That would be even worse than an unfortunate coincidence.

This is not the first time we’ve run into another book using the same art on the cover as ours (although it’s not common). But it was the first one where we decided we had to redo ours. This time, it exceeded the proximity threshold.

Oh, and one final note about proximity: You’re running out of time to buy the Space Travelers Storybundle, curated by Kristine Kathryn Rusch. Click here to learn more about this bundle—which includes WMG books Duplicate Effort, A Retrieval Artist Novel by Kris, Sector Justice: A Seeders Universe Novel by Dean Wesley Smith, and Fiction River Presents: Space Travelers.

As for me, I’m off to the post office—on foot, of course.

Allyson Longueira is publisher of WMG Publishing. She is an award-winning writer, editor and designer, working mother, and brain tumor survivor.

Publisher’s Note: Sizzling Release to Mark the Start of Summer

Here on the Oregon Coast, we mark the start of summer not at Memorial Day weekend (as is the custom everywhere else I have lived) but with the Fourth of July, because that’s when the tourist season really heats up in this little coastal town.

And I can’t think of a better way to kick off the summer than with our latest Fiction River volume. It’s a special edition edited by Kristine Grayson called Summer Sizzles. And wow, does it.

Here’s the synopsis:

In this fourth Fiction River Special Edition, bestselling romance author and editor Kristine Grayson takes readers into the world of romantic suspense. These nine breathtaking stories—from military romance to love in the criminal underworld, from a highly unusual shipboard romance to a modern gothic novella set on an idyllic island—make a perfect beginning to summer reading. The heat of attraction, the sparks of passion, and the frisson of suspense all thread their way through every story in this spectacular volume.

Table of Contents:
“Night Moves” by Katie Pressa
“Safe Like Cedar” by Lisa Silverthorne
“Flying Above the Hindu Kush” by M.L. Buchman
“Love on the Run” by Kelly Washington
“Need to Know” by Sabrina Chase
“Bribing Ghosts” by Leah Cutter
“Come Summer, Come Winter, I’ll Come for You” by Rei Rosenquist
“Totality” by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
“That Summer on Blue Heron Island” by Dayle A. Dermatis

This scintillating volume is available in ebook and paperback here. And don’t forget about the subscription option so you never miss a volume. Learn more here.

So, once the Fourth of July fireworks have faded (or if fireworks just aren’t your jam in the first place), grab a copy of this latest Fiction River and watch sparks fly on the page instead.

Allyson Longueira is publisher of WMG Publishing. She is an award-winning writer, editor and designer, working mother, and brain tumor survivor.

Publisher’s Note: When You Need a Little Space


While I was out on medical leave, some very cool space news happened. Astronomers announced on April 10 that they had finally captured a picture of something most people thought we’d never see: a black hole. This was very early on in my recovery, but even I recognized how monumental that little news notification on my iPhone was.

If you haven’t heard about that yet or read about it, click here.

I had to read about it in pieces, but I read everything I could find over the next few days. (Of course, the fact that a woman is the face of this discovery was also very cool!)

Space has fascinated me for as long as I can remember. I was even in Young Astronauts in junior high and seriously considered studying aerospace engineering in college.

Although I obviously did choose that path, I still find myself staring up at the night sky and wondering what all is out there.

Kristine Kathryn Rusch and I have this (and many other things) in common. In fact space, particularly space travel, is the inspiration for not only a new Fiction River Presents, which she edited, but also a new Storybundle, which she curated.

About the Space Travelers Storybundle, she says:

When most people think of science fiction, they think of space, that final frontier. They think of traveling in space or living in space or being in space. Eventually, they come back to Earth and think about things like time travel or futuristic gadgets, but ask the normal person what they imagine when someone says “science fiction,” and they respond “space.”

I know my love for sf came from my love for space. I discovered both at the same time. I watched the Apollo program throughout my childhood, and the same year I discovered Star Trek, I also watched human beings land on the Moon. That fired my imagination so firmly that I think nothing can shake those two things apart. Space is something, for me, to look forward to.

Space is hope.

Space isn’t always hope, not for the people (and creatures) involved in this Space Traveler bundle. Sometimes space is adventure. Sometimes space is scary. And often space is fascinating—like nothing we’ve seen before.

Click here to learn more about this bundle—which includes WMG books Duplicate Effort, A Retrieval Artist Novel by Kris, Sector Justice: A Seeders Universe Novel by Dean Wesley Smith, and Fiction River Presents: Space Travelers.

The latter, which also released as a standalone product last week, is the latest in the Fiction River Presents magazine line, which features reprints of some of our favorite Fiction River stories. (To read more about Fiction River and its subscription options click here.)

Here’s the synopsis for Fiction River Presents: Space Travelers:

Pulling from the list of her favorite stories for this volume of Fiction River Presents, editor Kristine Kathryn Rusch takes readers on a thrilling journey. From little rovers exploring the planets where humans cannot yet go, to human explorers flung into realms of space/time beyond their knowledge and experience, to aliens who drop in for a visit to Earth for purposes only they can fathom—these travelers entertain, sometimes terrify, and always fascinate.

With this tantalizing volume, Rusch asks the reader, “Wanna go for a ride?”

Table of Contents:
“Tendrils” by Leigh Saunders
“Moonfall” by Lisa Silverthorne
“The Rock of Kansas” by Eric Kent Edstrom
“Hot Jupiters” by Steven Mohan, Jr.
“Embedded” by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
“Ice Dogs” by Kris Austen Radcliffe
“Closing the Big Bang” by Michéle Laframboise
“Time, Expressed as an Entrée” by Robert T. Jeschonek

Click here to buy the new volume on its own.

And in other space news, Kris’ latest Diving Universe novel, The Renegat, is now available for ebook preorder.

Here’s the synopsis:

As a young recruit, brilliant engineer Nadim Crowe accidentally destroys an entire Boneyard full of ships. Now, decades later, he ends up on the crew of the Renegat, the only ship in the Fleet ever sent on a mission backwards to investigate an ancient Boneyard.

Something invaded that Boneyard and the Fleet wants to know what. Or who.

The Renegat: The only ship the Fleet dares risk. The Renegat: A ship of misfits and screw-ups sent on an impossible mission. All alone in deep space.

A thrilling new addition to the Diving Universe.

Click here for more information on that.

So much space. So little time.

Allyson Longueira is publisher of WMG Publishing. She is an award-winning writer, editor and designer, working mother, and brain tumor survivor.

Publisher’s Note: I’m Back!


You haven’t heard from me for 12 weeks, and I am very glad to be back at the helm of WMG. But so much has happened since the last blog I wrote was published, I don’t quite know where to begin.

On that date—March 25, 2019—I spent the morning working from home on the Kristine Grayson website before checking in as an outpatient at the local hospital for a scheduled MRI.

But first, let me explain how we got to the MRI in the first place.

For what I now know is about two years, my health was in decline. I didn’t start to really notice until last fall when I began having problems communicating. I would be speaking and all of a sudden, I would stop being able to make words. Not for long. Just a minute or two. Still, it freaked me out. But it would pass, and like lots of other busy, successful women past 40, I brushed it off as just a sign that I was getting older. I had people counting on me in my personal, professional, and civic lives, and I wasn’t going to let a few bumps in the road slow me down. Just like I hadn’t let the joint issues and fatigue I’d been experiencing for at least a year slow me down.

Then, just as 2018 was drawing to a close, the weirdest thing happened. I was in a restaurant with my husband, mom, and stepfather, and my right hand suddenly went numb. The numbness slowly spread up my arm in an eight-inch block until it crossed my back and hit my spine and then it was gone. I’ve never felt anything like it, and it scared the hell out of me. But still, I brushed it off as another issue with my spine or tendons like so many issues I’ve had before. You do that when you’re a chronic pain sufferer, as I have been since the age of 16. You just suck it up and continue on.

And so I did. Until the next time it happened. Similar, but different. At this point, I realized I should go see my primary care physician to at least discuss what was going on and get an actual medical opinion. My fear was multiple sclerosis. It runs in my family.

It took a while to get the appointment, but by the time I did, I was ready. I’d been Googling symptoms (not recommended if you don’t know what you’re doing…you’ll be convinced you’re dying no matter what it is), and I had a list of things I couldn’t explain dating back about two years. That list might have saved my life.

My doctor used that list to fight with my insurance company to get the MRI approved. She suspected a brain tumor. I had ruled that out in my research because I wasn’t having seizures. At least not the kind I’d heard about, like grand mal seizures. But while she checked for a whole host of other possibilities, she wasn’t willing to drop the MRI. And my list helped her win that battle.

Thank goodness she did. (I would have paid for it out-of-pocket if they had, but it would have taken longer to schedule…time it turns out I didn’t have.)

So, on the Monday of Spring Break, I went in for my MRI. I asked my husband to drive me, which is weird because I am very independent and usually handle all of this stuff on my own. And there’s no reason you can’t drive after an MRI. Plus, the hospital is less than five miles from my house. But ask him I did. He must have sensed something, too, because he waited in the parking lot for me to text him that the test was over.

They did the test. It didn’t take as long as I thought it would. And when the tech pulled me out of the machine, he asked me one question before my world tilted on its axis: How are you feeling? Fine, I said.

Then, he told me that the doctor had been reading my scans in real time and had asked the tech to walk me straight to the ER to be admitted. I didn’t even have a chance to change out of the scrubs they had me wear for the test. I stopped only long enough to text my husband. This is the message he received: “Being admitted to ER. Please come.”

He was there almost instantly. I can only imagine what that text did to him.

Upon being admitted to the ER, I got the news from an ER doc I’ve known for a long time (it’s a small town): I had a very large tumor (4.8 cm by 4.5 cm) on the left side of my brain. They suspected benign meningioma, but I would need to be transferred to a hospital in the Valley. I would need to have a craniotomy within days to remove the tumor. The size made it very serious. And when they did the neuro exam in the ER, I realized for the first time how much I had been ignoring. The doctor asked me to hop on one foot—and I couldn’t remember how to do that.

I was transferred to the ICU to await a bed at OHSU (my preferred hospital as it has a dedicated brain center and renowned neurology department). Thankfully, it was also in-network.

On Tuesday, I was admitted to OHSU in Portland. Once there, I found out that the scariest symptoms I’d been having were actually partial (focal) seizures—the very thing I thought I wasn’t having, which made me rule out brain tumor. The weird numbness thing: a partial (meaning only affecting one area of the brain…you are very aware of what’s happening to you) seizure called a Jacksonian march seizure. The speech issues were another type of seizure. I was started on anticonvulsants immediately.

I spent Wednesday getting my affairs in order, just in case. Thursday, I underwent an angiogram to see if they could preempt significant blood loss during the craniotomy (they couldn’t, as it turns out).

Friday, March 29, the neurosurgeon cut open my skull and removed the tumor. On Monday, April 1, they sent me home to continue the long recovery process.

I have so much more to say about that, but not now. This is already longer than the longest blog I’d written to date.

But I will say this much more: one of the biggest challenges I’ve faced in my recovery is regaining the use of my right hand (which I couldn’t move or feel at all after the surgery). Because of the brain trauma, I was on head injury protocol for the first six weeks of recovery. My screen time was very limited. I couldn’t watch TV for weeks. Even reading was hard. I couldn’t handle noise or movement or even talking on the phone.

I still have months of recovery ahead of me, but I’m at least 80 percent back now. I’m typing this blog at close to my pre-tumor speed, so that tells you something about the progress I’ve made toward regaining that right hand function. I’m walking more than I have in two years. My brain is still not where it once was, but that was expected to be the slowest of all to recover.

I still can’t drive. I had two seizures after my surgery that required an increase of my anticonvulsants. I will be on those for at least one more month and perhaps for the rest of my life. We don’t know yet.

And my tumor wasn’t benign, but it wasn’t cancer either, thankfully. It was atypical, a form of WHO Grade II meningioma called clear cell, which is more common in people my age but is very rare overall, and much more aggressive than other types, so it has a much higher chance of regrowing, even with a gross total resection, as I had. So, I will have two more MRIs this year and at least one per year for the rest of my life. I might need to have another craniotomy in the future. I might need to have radiation at that point as well. Or it might never recur. I’m going to focus my energy on the latter.

So, I’m back in the saddle again. And I’m so very glad to be here.

I didn’t stop working completely during my recovery, of course, because I’m me (and yes, I was working from my hospital bed in the days leading up to the surgery). But while the amazing WMG staff was taking on the yeoman’s task of doing my job on top of theirs, I helped where I could.

My most significant contribution was to the Grayson novels and omnibuses we had scheduled for release before I abruptly left for my tour in tumorville. I had already set the design template for the new Grayson look, so I was able to continue working on those covers during my recovery. It was very helpful for my mental state to feel like I could still contribute something. And while I believed I had found the art for the newest Grayson novel, Hidden Charm, I felt like I should read at least some of the book to make sure.

Before I knew it, I had read the whole thing. And reading was still hard. So, if I read it that fast post-brain surgery, you will understand how incredibly good it is.

Here’s the synopsis:

When a Charming Prince named Sonny rescues Rapunzel from her tower prison, she rides off with him and gets on with her life—her real life in the Greater World. They set up a home in Los Angeles, and she begins to discover the strength of her magic.

But when Sonny disappears, Rapunzel needs help finding him.

Enter Henry, the Frog Prince, who works the front desk of the Archetype Place. Only Henry can help Rapunzel find her husband because of the vast power it took to conquer Sonny. But Henry wants nothing to do with Rapunzel or her problem. He fights enough of his own.

A typically fun Grayson romp through the world of magic and love.

Hidden Charm is available for preorder now, and it officially releases Tuesday, June 18. Click here for more details.

Also releasing on June 18, as Gwyneth mentioned in this blog last week, is the fourth omnibus of the Grayson novels, this one containing Wickedly Charming, Charming Blue, and Hidden Charm. That’s the way to go if you like ebooks and want to read (or reread) the other two novels that came before this latest one. Click here for more details.

Finally, I want to thank everyone for their patience and support during this trying time. We’re a small staff with big jobs, so when one of us goes down, it’s a big impact. And I received so many cards and emails at home while I was recovering wishing me well that what I mostly felt during my recovery, and still feel today, is grateful. I am a very lucky woman, and I’m thankful that my story, too, had a happy ending.

Allyson Longueira is publisher of WMG Publishing. She is an award-winning writer, editor and designer, working mother, and brain tumor survivor.